Music Jobs & Music Industry Resources

Public Relations Jobs and Careers

Publicity Careers and Employment




 

Public Relations and Publicity Careers

Public Relations Jobs | Publicity Careers

Public relations specialists create and maintain a favorable public image for the organization they represent. They design media releases to shape public perception of their organization and to increase awareness of its work and goals. 

Public Relations Specialist Duties:

  • Write press releases and prepare information for the media
  • Respond to information requests from the media
  • Help clients communicate effectively with the public
  • Help maintain their organization's corporate image and identity
  • Draft speeches and arrange interviews for an organization’s top executives
  • Evaluate advertising and promotion programs to determine whether they are compatible with their organization’s public relations efforts

Public relations specialists, also called communications specialists and media specialists, handle an organization’s communication with the public, including consumers, investors, reporters, and other media specialists. In government, public relations specialists may be called press secretaries. In this setting, workers keep the public informed about the activities of government officials and agencies.

Public relations specialists draft press releases and contact people in the media who might print or broadcast their material. Many radio or television special reports, newspaper stories, and magazine articles start at the desks of public relations specialists. For example, a press release might describe a public issue, such as health, energy, or the environment, and what an organization does with regard to that issue.
In addition to publication through traditional media outlets, press releases are increasingly being sent through the Internet and social media.

Work Environment

Public relations specialists are different from advertisers in that they get their stories covered by media instead of purchasing ad space in publications and on television.

Public relations specialists held about 229,100 jobs in 2012. The industries that employed the most public relations specialists in 2012 were as follows: 

  • Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 20%
  • Advertising, public relations, and related services 14
  • Educational services; state, local, and private 12
  • Government 9
  • Health care and social assistance 8

Public relations specialists usually work in offices, but they also deliver speeches, attend meetings and community activities, and occasionally travel.  Typical public relations specialists work full time during regular business hours. Long workdays are common, as is overtime.

Ways to Get Public Relations Jobs

Public relations specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree. Employers prefer candidates who have studied public relations, journalism, communications, English, or business.

Education Requirements for Public Relations

Public relations specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree in public relations, journalism, communications, English, or business. Through such programs, students produce a portfolio of work that demonstrates their ability to prospective employers.

Public Relations Training

Entry-level workers typically begin by maintaining files of material about an organization’s activities, skimming and retaining relevant media articles, and assembling information for speeches and pamphlets. After gaining experience, public relations specialists begin to write news releases, speeches, articles for publication, or carry out public relations programs.

Experience

Internships at public relations firms or in the public relations departments of other businesses can be helpful in getting a job as a public relations specialist.
Some employers prefer candidates that have experience communicating with others through a school newspaper or a leadership position in school or in their community.

Qualities

  • Interpersonal skills. Public relations specialists deal with the public and the media regularly; therefore, they must be open and friendly to maintain a favorable image for their organization.
  • Organizational skills. Public relations specialists are often in charge of managing several events at the same time, requiring superior organizational skills.
  • Problem-solving skills. Public relations specialists sometimes must explain how a company or client is handling sensitive issues. They must use good judgment in what they report and how they report it.
  • Speaking skills. Public relations specialists regularly speak on behalf of their organization. When doing so, they must be able to clearly explain the organization’s position.
  • Writing skills. Public relations specialists must be able to write well-organized and clear press releases and speeches. They must be able to grasp the key messages they want to get across and write them in a short, succinct way to get the attention of busy readers or listeners.

Job Openings:

Public Relations Earnings and Pay Averages

The median annual wage for public relations specialists was $54,170 in May 2012. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $30,760, and the top 10 percent earned above $101,030.

Most public relations specialists work full time during regular business hours. Long workdays are common, as is overtime.

Job Prospects and Outlook

Employment of public relations specialists is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

Organizations will continue to emphasize community outreach and customer relations as a way to maintain and enhance their reputation and visibility. Public opinion can change quickly, particularly because both good and bad news spreads rapidly through the Internet. Consequently, public relations specialists will be needed to respond to news developments and maintain their organization’s reputation.

Increased use of social media also is expected to increase employment for public relations specialists. These media outlets will create more work for public relations specialists as they try to appeal to consumers and the general public in new ways. Public relations specialists will be needed to help their clients use these new types of social media effectively.

Because many college graduates apply for the limited amount of public relations positions each year, candidates can expect strong competition for jobs.  Candidates can expect particularly strong competition at advertising firms, organizations with large media exposure, and at prestigious public relations firms.

These Jobs Listings allow you to search a broad category of Publicity related employment. Feel free to refine your Publicity job search by typing in specific job names into the what line item on the jobs board listings page.  Job duties may include publicizing events, concerts, company parties, and business events.

Public Relations Job Listings By City and State

State 1st Largest City 2nd Largest City
Alabama Birmingham Montgomery
Alaska Anchorage Fairbanks
Arizona Phoenix Tucson
Arkansas Little Rock Fort Smith
California Los Angeles San Diego
Colorado Denver Colorado Springs
Connecticut Bridgeport New Haven
Delaware Wilmington Dover
Florida Jacksonville Miami
Georgia Atlanta Augusta
Hawaii Honolulu Hilo
Idaho Boise Nampa
Illinois Chicago Aurora
Indiana Indianapolis Fort Wayne
Iowa Des Moines Cedar Rapids
Kansas Wichita Overland Park
Kentucky Louisville Lexington
Louisiana New Orleans Baton Rouge
Maine Portland Lewiston
Maryland Baltimore Rockville
Massachusetts Boston Worcester
Michigan Detroit Grand Rapids
Minnesota Minneapolis Saint Paul
Mississippi Jackson Gulfport
Missouri Kansas City Saint Louis
Montana Billings Missoula
Nebraska Omaha Lincoln
Nevada Las Vegas Henderson
New Hampshire Manchester Nashua
New Jersey Newark Jersey City
New Mexico Albuquerque Las Cruces
New York New York Buffalo
North Carolina Charlotte Raleigh
North Dakota Fargo Bismarck
Ohio Columbus Cleveland
Oklahoma Oklahoma City Tulsa
Oregon Portland Salem
Pennsylvania Philadelphia Pittsburgh
Rhode Island Providence Warwick
South Carolina Columbia Charleston
South Dakota Sioux Falls Rapid City
Tennessee Memphis Nashville
Texas Houston San Antonio
Utah Salt Lake City West Valley City
Vermont Burlington Essex
Virginia Virginia Beach Norfolk
Washington Seattle Spokane
West Virginia Charleston Huntington
Wisconsin Milwaukee Madison
Wyoming Cheyenne Casper